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General Information

Like plumcots, apriums are a hybrid fruit – a cross between an apricot and a plum, with a higher percentage of apricot characteristics. While apriums have the exterior appearance of an apricot, the flavor has perceptible plum qualities and a firm yet juicy flesh.

 

 

 

Availability

Aprium harvest starts in mid May with the Bella Jewel variety. In June, look for Bella Sun and then in July and August, we harvest our Rose and Purple Rose varieties. See Availability chart for more details.

 

 

 

Nutrition Information

Official nutritional analysis is not available for apiums. For an approximate reference, see apricot nutrition information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selection and Storage

Apriums and apricots are picked when the fruit has fully matured on the tree. At this point they have achieved their maximum size and sugar but often not their full orange color. They will occasionally have a slight tinge of green to the skin even though the flesh inside is orange. Look for fruit that is firm with a little “give” and a fragrant aroma. Some pieces of fruit may have splashes of red color on them while others may not. This merely means one piece of fruit got more sunlight than the other but it is not an indication of ripeness or sweetness. If your apricots have any green visible, keep them at room temperature for a day or two to ripen. Once they are soft, they can be stored in the refrigerator for approximately one week.

 

 

 

General Information

Flat peaches and nectarines are known by several names. We call our flat peaches “Saturn” and our flat nectarines “Saucer.” This group of fruit is naturally flat and donut-shaped. In the past, the only flat varieties were white flesh peaches; that is rapidly evolving to include yellow flesh and nectarines. We currently grow two white and two yellow Saturn peaches and we’re working on developing a Saucer nectarine line.

 

 

 

Availability

See Availability Chart

 

 

 

Nutrition Information

Selection and Storage

The flat varieties of white peaches often have a pale green cast to the background color, even when they are ripe. This is simply a characteristic of these varieties and not an indication that they were picked too early. Storage at home depends on how you prefer to eat them and how ripe they were when you bought them. The temperature of home refrigerators can actually damage the eating quality of firm peaches and nectarines, turning them dry and mushy. If you prefer them crisp, purchase firm fruit and consume them within a day or two. If you like them soft and juicy, leave them out at room temperature (not in a plastic bag) until they reach that stage – then refrigerate. The fruit will remain at that stage and can be refrigerated for around a week. Soft, ripe fruit can be refrigerated without damaging the eating quality.

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Information

White peaches and nectarines have several characteristics that set them apart from their yellow counterparts. They have a delicate white flesh and an incredibly sweet taste due to their low acid levels. Acid is what gives yellow peaches and nectarines their slightly tangy flavor. As yellow varieties ripen, some of this acid dissipates, leaving a nice balance of sugar and acid. Because white peaches and nectarines have very low acid, they have the same sweet flavor whether you eat them crisp like an apple or wait for them to become soft and juicy.

 

 

 

Availability

White peaches are available from late April through mid-October. White nectarines are available from mid May through September. See Availability Chart.

 

 

 

Nutrition Information

Low fat; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; good source of vitamin C.

 

 

 

 

Selection and Storage

The amount of red color on the skin is not an indication of ripeness and can vary greatly from variety to variety. Look for a creamy white background color with no green. Storage at home depends on how you prefer to eat them and how ripe they were when you bought them. The temperature of home refrigerators can actually damage the eating quality of firm peaches and nectarines, turning them dry and mushy. If you prefer them crisp, purchase firm fruit and consume them within a day or two. If you like them soft and juicy, leave them out at room temperature (not in a plastic bag) until they reach that stage – then refrigerate. The fruit will remain at that stage and can be refrigerated for around a week. . Soft, ripe fruit can be refrigerated without damaging the eating quality.

 

 

How to select the sweetest nectarines:

Look For:

The “sugar spots” – This is an indication the fruit is so loaded with sugar, it’s essentially crystallizing on the skin.

 

General Information

Plumcots are a hybrid fruit, the result of carefully controlled cross-pollination between plums and apricots. Different varieties of plums, crossed with different varieties of apricots have yielded a wide array of plumcot varieties, with more arriving every year. Each variety has a relatively short window of availability, about three weeks on average, and each variety has its own unique appearance and flavor attributes.

Plumcots are also known as Pluots®. California plant breeder Floyd Zaiger is widely credited with the development of this flavorful fruit he called a pluot (pronounced plew-ott). Mr. Zaiger saw so much potential in this fruit, he decided many years ago to register that name as a trademark. For many years, virtually all pluot trees in commercial production were Zaiger varieties, and most still are. However, other breeders have begun to make their own crosses of plum and apricot varieties and they cannot legally call their trees pluots. Because of this, many in the fruit marketing industry decided to change the name of the fruit to plumcot which we believe is a much more direct description of what this fruit actually is. This name change is voluntary for the most part and will take a few years to become widespread. Just know that whether you find our fruit marked as plumcots or pluots in your local store, it’s the same great-tasting fruit.

Varieties and Availability

Our plumcots are available from May through October. See below for photos and descriptions. See Availability Chart for additional information.

 

 

Nutrition Information

Emerging research suggests that many varieties of plumcots can be considered “superfoods” thanks to their high level of antioxidants. AgriLife Research at Texas A&M University found that many varieties of plumcots and plums matched or exceeded the much-touted blueberry in antioxidants and phytonutrients associated with disease prevention. Plumcots are also fat free, saturated fat free, sodium free, cholesterol free and a good source of vitamin C.

 

Selection and Storage

Plumcots come in a very wide array of colors so don’t limit yourself by looking for just one color; some of the sweetest varieties are actually bright green. The fruit should be firm with just a slight “give” when gently squeezed. Avoid fruit that is overripe, characterized by loose skin and a “watery” feel to the fruit. Plumcots will continue to ripen at room temperature. Once the fruit reaches your desired softness, refrigerate it to keep it that way. Plumcots will last for a week or more in your refrigerator.

Plums and plumcots often have a white or silvery colored “coating” on them. This natural, waxy, protective coating is produced by the fruit itself. Often this coating is washed off in the packing process. Some varieties are considered too delicate for the packing line equipment and are packed carefully by hand, bypassing the washing process. Fruit packed in this manner is known as “bloom on” and is desired by many for its “straight from the orchard” appearance. Regardless of the level of bloom on your plum or plumcot, all fruit should be thoroughly rinsed with water before eating. The bloom is all natural and harmless but if you want to remove it completely, simply wipe the fruit with a cloth or paper towel.

 

General Information

Fresh apricots are an early summer treat, one that is growing rapidly in popularity. We are planting new varieties every year, eventually expanding apricot season throughout most of the summer months. Apricots have a sweet, rich flavor you’re sure to fall in love with.

 

 

 

Availability

Our apricots are available throughout the month of May and into the first part of June. Primary varieties are Apache and Earlicot. See Availability Chart.

 

 

 

Nutrition Information

Low fat, saturated fat free, cholesterol free, sodium free, excellent source of vitamin A and vitamin C, good source of potassium and fiber.

 

 

 

 

Selection and Storage

Apricots and apriums are picked when the fruit has fully matured on the tree. At this point they have achieved their maximum size and sugar but often not their full orange color. They will occasionally have a slight tinge of green to the skin even though the flesh inside is orange. Look for fruit that is firm with a little “give” and a fragrant aroma. Some pieces of fruit may have splashes of red color on them while others may not. This merely means one piece of fruit got more sunlight than the other but it is not an indication of ripeness or sweetness. If your apricots have any green visible, keep them at room temperature for a day or two to ripen. Once they are soft, they can be stored in the refrigerator for approximately one week.

Family Tree Farms - Our Mission is to Consistently Produce, Package and Market the Most Flavorful Fruit in the World.