Category Archives: Products

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Information

Cherries are one of the most anticipated fruits of summer. Our cherries are plump, bite-sized jewels with a sweet, rich flavor. Because of our location near the southern end of California’s cherry-growing region, we are able to bring you the first cherries of the summer.

 

 

 

Availability

Early California cherry season is short but sweet! See Availability Chart for details.

 

Brooks: 2nd week of May – late May

Large, deep red fruit, brighter red on stem end. Flesh is firm with shades of red and pink. Round and plump shape with approx. 1 1/2″ stems

 

Tulare: Mid May – 2nd week of June

Heart-shaped, bright red with approx. 2″ stems. Firm flesh is sweet with red/pink color.

 

Royal Rainier: Late May – mid June

Soft yellow with splashes of red/pink blush. Delicate, sweet flavored yellow/white flesh. Large, round and symmetrical with approx 1 ½” stems.

 

Bing: early June – late June

Deep, uniform, mahogany-colored skin and flesh. Rich, sweet and intensely flavored. Round and plump shape with approx. 2″ stems

 

 

 

Nutrition Information

Like many other dark-colored fruits and vegetables, cherries pack a powerful nutritional punch. The phytonutrients contained in cherries are thought to aid in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and certain cancers. In addition, cherries contain anthocyanins which have been shown to block inflammatory enzymes, reducing the pain caused by arthritis and similar conditions.

 

Fat free; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; good source of vitamin C; good source of potassium.

 

Selection and Storage

Look for cherries that are plump and firm with no signs of shriveling of softness. Store cherries in the refrigerator and rinse them with water just prior to eating.

 

 

 

 

Selection and Storage

Look for plump medium to large berries with uniform dark coloring. Avoid berries that look dry, shriveled or juicy. Blueberries should always be refrigerated until ready to eat. Rinse berries with cold water just prior to eating.

 

General Information

We may not be the biggest, but with one taste we think you’ll agree- we’re probably the best when it comes to growing blueberries. We did our homework and planted only the most flavorful varieties available.

 

Blueberries are one of the few fruits native to North America. They are also known as the only naturally blue food item. Ripe blueberries are deep indigo blue in color with a grayish looking natural waxy coating called bloom. The bloom is nature’s way of protecting the blueberries from external moisture while keeping them juicy and plump on the inside. The flesh of a blueberry is surprisingly green.

 

 

 

Availability

Our location in California produces some of the first U.S.-grown blueberries available each spring. Harvest begins in mid-April and lasts through early June. See Availability Chart for details.

 

 

 

Nutrition Information

The good news just keeps coming regarding the health benefits of eating blueberries. They are probably best known for their high antioxidant content. Based on data from the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (Boston, MA), blueberries are among the fruits with the highest antioxidant activity.  Using a test called ORAC (Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity), researchers have shown that a serving of fresh blueberries provided more antioxidant activity than many other fresh fruits and vegetables. 

 

Other areas of research where blueberries are yielding exciting discoveries include:

 

  • Prevention of age-related loss of memory and motor skills

  • Prevention of cancer and heart disease

  • Prevention of urinary tract infections

  • Reduction of belly fat


 

 

 

 

General Information

Yellow flesh peaches and nectarines are traditional summertime favorites. Sugar and acid in the fruit are responsible for the harmonious flavor balance of sweet and tangy. Many of our new varieties of yellow nectarines have lower acid levels, similar to white flesh varieties. This gives them an even sweeter flavor while still retaining a bit of the acid for that traditional flavor.

 

 

 

Availability

Yellow peaches and nectarines are available from late April through October. See Availability Chart.

 

 

 

Nutrition Information

Yellow peaches and nectarines are low fat; saturated fat free; sodium free; cholesterol free; good source of vitamin C.

 

 

 

Selection and Storage

The amount of red color on the skin is not an indication of ripeness and can vary greatly from variety to variety. Look for a yellow/orange background color with no green. An insiders tip on how to select the sweetest nectarines: Look for the “sugar spots.” This is an indication the fruit is so loaded with sugar it’s essentially crystallizing on the skin. Storage at home depends on how you prefer to eat them and how ripe they were when you bought them. The temperature of home refrigerators can actually damage the eating quality of firm peaches and nectarines, turning them dry and mushy. If you prefer them crisp, refrigerate. The fruit will remain at that stage and can be refrigerated for around a week. Soft, ripe fruit can be refrigerated without damaging the eating quality.

 

 

How to select the sweetest nectarines:

Look for:

The “sugar spots” – This is an indication the fruit is so loaded with sugar, it’s essentially crystallizing on the skin.

 

 

 

General Information

Although plums are believed to have originated in ancient China, most fresh plums are known as Japanese plums. Plums come in a wide array of skin and flesh colors, each with slightly different flavor profiles.

 

 

Availability

Plums are available from late May through October. For simplicity, plums are generally identified in the store by skin color – red or black.

See Availability Chart for details.

 

 

Nutrition Information

Emerging research suggests that many varieties of plums can be considered a “superfood” thanks to their high level of antioxidants. Research conducted by AgriLife Research at Texas A&M University found that many varieties of plums and plumcots matched or exceeded the much-touted blueberry in antioxidants and phytonutrients associated with disease prevention. Plums are also fat free, saturated fat free, sodium free, cholesterol free and a good source of vitamin C.

 

Selection and Storage

There are over 150 varieties of fresh plums grown in California but most are sold in stores as simply red or black. The skin color has no bearing on flavor or sweetness, it’s merely a varietal characteristic. Plums have subtle differences in flavor from variety to variety, far more so than peaches or nectarines. Look for uniformly firm fruit. Avoid overripe fruit that feels “watery” or fruit that has shriveled skin. Plums will continue to ripen at room temperature. Once the fruit reaches your desired softness, refrigerate it to keep it that way. Plums will last for a week or more in your refrigerator.

Plums and plumcots often have a white or silvery colored “coating” on them. This natural, waxy, protective coating is produced by the fruit itself. Most of this coating is washed off in the packing process. Some varieties are considered too delicate for the packing line equipment and are packed carefully by hand, bypassing the washing process. Fruit packed in this manner is known as “bloom on” and is often considered more desirable for its “straight from the orchard” appearance. Regardless of the level of bloom on your plum or plumcot, all fruit should be thoroughly rinsed with water before eating. The bloom is completely natural and harmless but if you want to remove it completely, simply wipe the
fruit with a cloth or paper towel.

 

 

General Information

Like plumcots, apriums are a hybrid fruit – a cross between an apricot and a plum, with a higher percentage of apricot characteristics. While apriums have the exterior appearance of an apricot, the flavor has perceptible plum qualities and a firm yet juicy flesh.

 

 

 

Availability

Aprium harvest starts in mid May with the Bella Jewel variety. In June, look for Bella Sun and then in July and August, we harvest our Rose and Purple Rose varieties. See Availability chart for more details.

 

 

 

Nutrition Information

Official nutritional analysis is not available for apiums. For an approximate reference, see apricot nutrition information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selection and Storage

Apriums and apricots are picked when the fruit has fully matured on the tree. At this point they have achieved their maximum size and sugar but often not their full orange color. They will occasionally have a slight tinge of green to the skin even though the flesh inside is orange. Look for fruit that is firm with a little “give” and a fragrant aroma. Some pieces of fruit may have splashes of red color on them while others may not. This merely means one piece of fruit got more sunlight than the other but it is not an indication of ripeness or sweetness. If your apricots have any green visible, keep them at room temperature for a day or two to ripen. Once they are soft, they can be stored in the refrigerator for approximately one week.

Family Tree Farms - Our Mission is to Consistently Produce, Package and Market the Most Flavorful Fruit in the World.